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Is Halloween celebrated in your country? :pumpkin: 

64%
2,806 deviants said Yes and it's awesome :iconlawooplz:
15%
642 deviants said No but I wish it was :iconbawsonplz:
8%
351 deviants said Yes and I hate it :iconbcfaceplz:
8%
339 deviants said We have other traditions/holidays celebrated around this time of year but you've probably never heard of them. :iconhipstercatplz:
6%
256 deviants said No and I'm glad it isn't :meow:

Devious Comments

:iconfarfoosh:
farfoosh Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
no, but I wish it was : (
Reply
:iconlarkspur-kiwipickle:
Larkspur-KiwiPickle Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
American exchange student in Europe, where people kind of celebrate Halloween but not really.
I missed it SO SO SO SO MUUUUHUUUUCH ;3;
Reply
:iconnearoc:
NearoC Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012   Digital Artist
Yes + Never even remember it though, neither pro nor anti.
Reply
:icondarkzizanie:
darkzizanie Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Student General Artist
Not really celebrated in France. We got All Saint's Day on the first of November which is a day of public holiday but Halloween's tradition never come around to be celebrated. That's too bad.
I remember doing the whole door-to-door thing when I was little but I reckon not a lot of people had something to give us.
Now it's more of a thing to celebrate between friends, like buying candies and watching horror movies all night long. There's nothing in the street that could show anyone is celebrating.

I just came back from Ireland, and I was over there on the 31st, and DAMN. They do celebrate it. I mean, really, every shop and house had at least some black and orange, a ghost hanging somewhere or a pumpkin on the counter. And stickers on every window. There was even some shop clerks who where disguised and/or covered in make-up. No need to had that a looooot of people where dressed-up in the street and there was a lot of partying going on that night. (even if, sadly, for a lot of girls it just mean going out under-dressed and sporting mini-mini-mini-skirts.)

I wish it could be the same around here. I love autumn and well, it's better with some Halloween spirit. But no, instead we already have freaking x-mas decorations all over the streets. It's not even winter, trees are still green, you can go out with no coat, but there are deers and santa's hat everywhere. That's kind of sick. Well.
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:iconsomniacscaper:
somniacscaper Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Guy Fawkes tonight. (5th)

Remember remember the fifth of November
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
I see no reason why gunpowder, treason
Should ever be forgot...

V
Reply
:iconcircuitdruid:
CircuitDruid Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
needs an option for "how about sorta, maybe not really, some pumpkins show up in supermarkets, meh"

Halloween is really not part of the culture in AUS but there is some vague silliness and a few parties about. We have a lot of different cultures clustered up in Melbourne though, and while there is not much hype over any particular celebration aside from a generic 'x-mass', there are usually all sorts of random traditional celebrations begin cropping up around this time of year, many of them being held by a family of one culture wishing to share their homelands traditions with their friends. If some of them want to dress up in silly costumes to do so, hey power to them.
Reply
:icondragonbucaro:
dragonbucaro Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012
Dia de muertos
Reply
:iconniverdia:
Niverdia Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
We have Martin's day, which traditionally opens the costume season, which ends by the beginning of Lent/Ash day, because we're cool and love dress-ups. :p
Reply
:icondar-a:
dar-a Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Student General Artist
no, we don't. however, there WAS a national holiday back in 19th 18th 17th centuries and so on, and it was called Sochelnick (accent at E). It was celebrated at Christmas eve and kids have been dressing up as animals and monsters, going to others' homes at night and singing special songs called kolyadi (accent at A). If they sung it, home owners gave them candy and cakes. If they refused to give candy, children scared their cattle, stomped ground or blocked the doors with snow in return.

However, this tradition was successfully forgotten because of the atheist politics of the Ussr :c
and yeah, I'm from Russia.
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:iconmanearion:
Manearion Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes.

But there is also Allahelgonaafton which you don't celebrate so I kinda need to mark two of these... Although Halloween is perhaps 15 years old here in Sweden, so maybe I'll just mark the last one to seem more exotic~
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